Canine Osteosarcoma Vaccine

Starting late February, 2018, VCSS will be participating in a study to evaluate the Canine Osteosarcoma Vaccine, Live Listeria Vector (COV-LLV), a USDA conditionally licensed product for dogs with osteosarcoma who have undergone amputation and chemotherapy. For participation, your dog must meet certain eligibility requirements which will be determined and discussed during a consultation. Eligibili...

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Does your dog have bladder cancer?

Canine bladder tumors, most commonly transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) or urethelial carcinoma, have long been a frustrating disease to diagnose.  Diagnosis can be expensive or invasive.  There is potential risk for tumor seeding in the process (spreading cancer around with a needle or biopsy instrument).  But, there is good news!  There is a new, simple diagnostic […]

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Why Oncologists Love CBCs (Complete Blood cell Counts)

The complete blood cell count (CBC) and its differential provide a wealth of information to the veterinary practitioner. As an oncologist, it is of utmost importance in monitoring a patient’s tolerance of a chemotherapy drug and his risk for complications associated with bone marrow toxicity. The primary concern is typically for sepsis as a consequence […]

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A Team Effort to Improving Margins & Success: Medical Oncology, Surgical Oncology, Pathology

by Kim Freeman, DVM, DACVIM (Oncology) | John Wooldridge DVM, DACVS Medical oncologists spend a lot of time looking at histopathology reports. These reports can be full of large, difficult-to-pronounce words describing the microscopic appearance of cell and nuclear morphology. Often these words seem superfluous and generally uninteresting and unnecessary. But, to an oncologist, they […]

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Thoughts On Our Amazing Staff and The Celebration of Life

I have had a very recent lesson and insight into both the human and the animal bond that our profession fosters, with an annual event that VCSS presents. At our Celebration of Life on September 25, clients and referring veterinarians (in some cases, clients are also veterinarians!) are invited to enjoy an afternoon barbeque and […]

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Massage Therapy for Cancer and Surgery Patients

by Rubi Sullivan of Heal Massage Massage is a wonderful way to keep an eye on your dog’s ever-changing body, as well as having many more physiological benefits. Our furry best friends tell us when they’re hungry or when they are ready to go play ball, but often times we miss the small changes in […]

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Moose: Superhero Cancer Fighting Canine

By Kim Freeman, DVM, DACVIM (Oncology) Moose, a 12 year old border collie, was diagnosed with high grade lymphoma over 18 months ago.  His face has become a staple in our lives and his family has become part of ours as Moose has gone through chemotherapy for his cancer.  Recently, Moose faced a new life challenge. […]

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Dr. Freeman Comments on Compassion Fatigue in Veterinary Medicine

Contrary to what many people might think, the veterinary profession isn’t always warm and fuzzy. Like any other health-care worker, those who care for others all day may feel drained, as though their well of empathy has run dry. It’s a phenomenon known as compassion fatigue. Mindfulness has become an important tool in navigating the […]

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Metronomic Chemotherapy

Metronomic chemotherapy is a rather new way of using traditional chemotherapy drugs to slow cancer growth.  “Metronomic” refers to a low dose of continuous treatment.  Think metronome.  It is different from the traditional way of using chemotherapy which involves giving patients a high dose, or what we call a “maximum tolerated dose” (MTD) of chemotherapy. […]

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